Tag Archives: Greece

The diggers

 

Orkney has been a famous location of prehistoric archaeology at least since the Skara Brae village was excavated in the 1930s. The fact that the four sites of Skara Brae, Maes Howe, the Ring of Brodgar and the Standing Stones of Stenness are all located within one small geographical area was marked in 1999 by UNESCO when it created the World Heritage Site of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney.

Since 2003 a new archaeology site has been excavated at the Ness of Brodgar nearby. It comprises a collection of large prehistoric stone buildings. Years of TV archaeology programmes like Time Team  encourage the opportunity to observe the professionals at work, although you do feel frustrated at how little is available to see compared to the more famous long-established locations.

 

 

Seeing teams of modern day archaeologists at work certainly emphasises how much more slow, painstaking and labour-intensive must have been the work by the earlier generations who brought to our knowledge all those famous historical sites from all over the world.

 

Part of the ancient site of Pompeii, Italy, first excavated in the 18th century. Photographed in 1999.

 

Part of the site of Knossos, Crete, excavated in the first half of the 20th century. Photographed in 2016.

 

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The widespread influence of La Serenissima

 

Would it be fair to say that most people think of Venice in the Middle Ages as a powerful and successful republic but not as an imperial power? The mercantile background of The Merchant of Venice rather than the military one of Othello, in other words. In fact, Venice had a number of colonies around the Mediterranean, Adriatic and Aegean Seas. One of these, for more than 400 years, from 1204 to 1669, was Crete. On a recent trip, I was struck to hear our guide describe Rethymno in Crete as the most Venetian town outside Venice.

 

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The Fortezza (fortress) in Rethymno, built in the 16th century.

 

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The former Venetian Harbour, with its later lighthouse.

 

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The Rimondo Fountain, built in the 1620s.

 

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The Archaeological Museum is located in the former church of a Franciscan monastery.

 

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The Loggia was built around 1600 as a meeting place for the nobility of the period.

 

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The former Nerantzes Mosque was first built as a Catholic church.

 

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Porta Goura was built in the 16th century.

 

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The Catholic Church of St Anthony of Padua. Although built only at the end of the 19th century, the building shares some of the proportions of the grander Baroque churches of Venice.

 

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The Arsenale in Venice, part of its complex of former shipyards and armouries.

 

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A canal view in Venice.

 

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A church exterior in Venice. These three photographs of Venice were taken in 1994.

 

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